Next Dimension: Post Mill

postmill-1dWith someone apparently turning the temperature up to ‘inferno’ over the past couple of days, my practice tweaked accordingly, veering toward something that hopefully would be a bit more picturesque than a fairground ride or Dale’s inflatable banana. It’s National Mills Weekend coming up too, so there’s further pertinence for you!

postmill-3Though, actually, I’d long been trying to put a post mill together, to go with my earlier tower mill, and in turn build my own counterpart to Jack and Jill, the Clayton windmills. The post mill comes with its own unique charm, to the extent at which I’m not sure which structure makes the better subject. In my earlier attempts, I struggled with the shapes and curves required for the main body – both at the top for the cap and at the bottom for rotating smoothly upon the roundhouse. Buoyed by momentum from my last 3D excursion, I decided to have another go.

Incidentally, I mostly used shots of Suffolk’s Stanton Mill for reference while building the model. How very pretty it is, and indeed pleasing to hear that the mill still works, even continuing to produce flour.

postmill-4The tricks learnt from the teacups came in very handy. I’d, for some reason, been reluctant to use Cinema 4D’s splines, instead pining for importing Illustrator artwork, but now I realise how much easier it can be with a bit more patience than I presumably had when trying it the first time. The rest of the structure was a rather similar exercise to the tower mill, but with hopefully a touch more polish to the finished item.

I then started playing with hair – Hair in Cinema, of course, could be used to make trees and shrubs! This is something I’ve not tried before – it was simple to implement but a terror to refine. I dropped hair onto some splines, and realised it was a bit of a terror on my processor aswell. After a more than thirty minute render, the featured image shows how well that went. Hmm! I don’t know what species they are, but they’re fun. I should say the willow trees were taken from the content browser – which I typically found lurking after all this. With render times only going up for their planting and impatience setting in, I ran with what I had and took to Photoshop to make just a few modifications. They look a bit rickety in places, but it does good to see the mill as part of a scene, rather than just plonked on a surface.

I’d certainly move in! Well, provided Weybourne isn’t for sale.

postmill-2B

Advertisements
27 comments
  1. Geke Hop-Wassink said:

    It’s a beautiful mill 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Geke! They are certainly handsome landmarks. I want one!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks Rebecca! I nearly gave your daughter a run for her money with these, as I stayed up until just before 5 (new record!!!) working on this – admittedly, this was mainly due to the perilously slow renders. However, I was so excited to finish, I was up within a few hours and back on it. I am exhausted, but it was nice to get that buzz. There we are, perhaps your daughter is just so into her graphics work that she can’t put it down! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • Well it was worth staying up, these are fantastic….can you build it now in real bricks and mortar? Lol you would have people queuing to move in❤️❤️

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        If only! What a blissful project that would be. But would I rather build this, or my own Crystal Maze? It’s a quandary.

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks Rebecca – glad to have done the structure justice, in that case!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Bill Fufkin said:

    My dear Jacob, you have excelled yourself…a definitely, seductively heavenly scene to which birdsong and gentle breeze plays in my mind. I wish I were there. B

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks ever so much, Bill. I wish I were there with you! One day I’ll have my own, and you can come along. 😉

      Like

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Camilla – indeed, these structures are a real treat to behold!

      Like

  3. Wow! Cool! This turned out great! I had to keep double-checking to see if it any of these were a photo reference. Nicely done! And cool structure… I’d not seen one quite like this before!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks Charlie – this was so much fun, and I’m glad they made you look twice; evidently it was worth all that rendering! Yes, this is a rather quintessential British, chocolate box version, with its white cladding and nice little roundhouse covering the main trestle. I want one! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        My bank balance as it is, it’d have to be a miniature model for now. Use your magic powers and shrink us, so we can go inside!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’ve always wished I could do that!! That and invisibility are on the top of my list! Flying used to be on it, but lately I’m terrified of heights. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Well, think of what you could get up to when invisible! As long as you’re confident in being able to make us big and visible again, then go ahead! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Might have to practice on the seal or zonkey first… just to be on the same side. Ohhhh…. how cute would a pocket zonkey be?? LOL

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Eee! Too cute for words! ❤

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Oh, Laura. Thank you, so much (and likewise, of course!).

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Cathe said:

    This is so cool Jacob. I can imagine the rendering time was very long. I have a very basic knowledge of CGI but super impressed with what you created!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks so much, Cathe. My hardware isn’t brilliant – understatement – and so it’s often not fond of me working in 3D, and with that I’m rather cautious of taking it too far. I’m saving up for some snazzier tools, as I’m having too much fun with it!

      Like

  5. Looks to me like you’re really doing a lot of digital stuff, learning new things, and I know it’s not easy in the least. Your hard work is paying off – looking good. And now I am learning about windmills from you too!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Cynthia! Like most areas of design it’s a daunting problem-solving exercise, but when you find a solution, it becomes a lot of fun – with the added windmill incentive, this became veritably addictive! Glad you enjoy the results!

      Liked by 1 person

Talk to me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: