Next Dimension: Boardman’s Mill

bordermans_3a
Well, it’s a Bank Holiday, and it wouldn’t be a decent use of the day without a wander around the countryside – this means we’re going to the Norfolk Broads, which in turn – ha – means an encounter with a windmill is unavoidable.

bordermans_2a
Yep, another one! What we have this time around is a trestle mill, though it’s more commonly referred to as a ‘skeleton’ mill, for obvious reasons. A timber open-frame structure – rather like a small smock mill without the cladding – these structures came considerably cheaper than a brick construction. As such, these were once plentiful around the Broads, though perhaps as is to be expected, only a couple remain.

My reference for this was Boardman’s Mill, or Vorderman’s Mill, as I used to believe it to be called. It’s a drainage pump standing on the bank of the River Ant, a short walk away from Ludham’s How Hill (and indeed just to the south of another of similar design). Built in 1897, it retired in 1938 after being knocked off its rather precarious brick chamber by high winds (not a hugely surprising fate!)

A less attractive prospective abode, maybe, but it was certainly interesting as a curious child to observe the innards of a windmill so immediately. I never dared scale that wobbly ladder to take a closer look, though! It has been periodically restored, but the last time I saw it up close it was looking rather worse for wear, which is a shame – it’s a delicate structure and one which surely requires greater care.

bordermans_4a
The main challenge for me here was that timber framework. I cloned the four outer corners and applied a slight inward tendency to give a taper. This trick didn’t work so well with the supporting beams, however; I ended up placing them manually, which might explain why some are a tad uneven. I realised after the build that constructing a perfectly vertical tower and then using the Taper tool on it might have done what I wanted much quicker; hey ho!

Another howler might have been my cloning of a reed several thousand times. The beds of reeds you see are touched up and duplicated in Photoshop post, but there were many in the original rendered scene. This reduced my computer to such a crawl that I feared I might have killed it. Oops! Well I know not to try that again.

I also thought I’d try playing with the nighttime Physical Sky settings in Cinema 4D, to perhaps exploit the open tower with a fiery sunset beaming through. Hmm! It looks pretty, and I enjoy very much the near-silhouette landscape, but I think it’s evident that the whole sunlight and sky element is something I need to revisit in greater depth; it’ll only benefit my models once I finally get it cracked.

bordermans_1dFor now though, let’s just imagine a pleasant and real sunset ride down the River Ant.

I need to get me a boat.

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31 comments
  1. Bill Fufkin said:

    These look a veritable delight…fascinating too. The sun makes me feel as if on Safari! B

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Haha – thanks, Bill. It was a bit of a haphazard job; who knew that creating a star would be so tough?

      Like

  2. Rebecca said:

    I particularly like the one with the drainage ditch, very Norfolk indeed! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Rebecca! I think that’s my favourite shot too. ‘Norfolk’ is reassuring, though I’m not sure the sky is overcast enough! 😉

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Wow, it’s amazing that this still stands after all those years, battered by our weather. Love your creations, I think the third looks so tranquil, and I can imagine you had a beautiful walk, especially adding in the great weather we had.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      It is indeed great that a couple have been protected, though as I say this required a little TLC the last time I saw it. I expect funding for such things is tight.

      Glad you enjoyed! It’s not been terrific weather here I must say, so any walks were postponed. One day in the not too distant future, though, I hope!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Laura! With a lot of cursing and hair pulling is how it’s done. 😉 This 3D stuff can be quite frustrating, but it does get exciting and addictive when the models start coming together.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Ok, so are these photos or renderings???? ( Of course, I know the answer, because you discussed how you created them in the above post, but holy craphausen. They look bloody lifelike. Espesh the sunset. That one looks like a photato of a windmill ( obviously) in the Aus outback or something.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks – I’m so pleased you like them! My confidence in the sunset was fluctuating wildly, so that’s very reassuring.

      (I love ‘photato’. I must adopt some of these words.)

      Liked by 1 person

      • It does look very real, rest assured!
        Along with ‘photato’ there is also ‘foter’, or even ‘photographizzle’ if things are in need of some outmoded Snoop Doggizing 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Haha, I’m still liking ‘photato’ the best. Certainly better than the Norfolk, which comes out something like ‘foo’uhgraaaf’!

        Liked by 1 person

      • haha, i’m totally gonna start calling them ‘foo’uhgraaf’s’ now 😀

        Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Ah, it’s reassuring to hear nice comments about the sunset as I was unsure – thanks, Charlie! It is a cleansing and peaceful place; the same can be said for much of the Broads. When you next come to England, take a trip to Norfolk and we’ll go!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, JP. Maybe you should come to the Broads for your honeymoon!

      Like

  5. what a lovely post and what fabulous images, they absolutely capture the unique atmosphere of the Broads, bravo!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Phil! I could work on Broads projects all day, so much fun. I think Midville Bridge deserves a nice creaky windmill! I’ll have to raise this in the village hall. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hehe, you’re so right Jacob, I appreciate you getting it on the agenda at the village hall, Midville just isn’t right without a creaky windmill 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Pingback: Upriver | jaywalks

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