Our Father

fatherted-1A

And so we finish our visit with the man himself, Father Ted Crilly. An insecure and somewhat crestfallen man, his decency wholly blinkered by cheap ambitions of wealth and celebrity, Ted was banished to inhospitable Craggy Island after funds for his previous parish were traced back to his own bank account. They were just resting there, though, as he’s keen to remind us… and he certainly wasn’t planning a trip to Las Vegas with the cash. As punishment, he now has to contend with the mayhem generated by his unhinged fellows; the overtly-childlike Dougal, the outrageous Jack, and the tireless housekeeper, Mrs Doyle. In this role, he’s regarded with loyalty by some and contempt by others; I imagine his fearsome foe, Bishop Brennan, hasn’t quite got over being kicked up the arse yet. We shan’t ask about that.

At times however, Ted’s (relatively) level head can prevail and be the voice of reason. Let’s not forget the time he courageously lead his group out of the lingerie department; the largest lingerie section in Ireland, I understand…

…or indeed the last time we saw him, when he helped a suicidal Father Kevin off of a ledge. This earned the admiration of an American priest, in turn almost landing our Father his dream of dispatching wayward peers and retreating to Los Angeles. Almost. Wracked with guilt that his housemates believe they too are coming to the States, he was unable to tell them otherwise, and ultimately abandoned the move. And so, Ted is stuck on Craggy Island, forever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever and ever…

Though the series was always intended to end here, any prospect of subsequent reacquaintance with the cast of Craggy Island down the line was taken from us, and in the worst way; Ted actor Dermot Morgan died suddenly, just a day after the Going to America swansong was recorded. A mercurial comic talent and quintessentially Father Ted, the show immediately became his legacy, and in that it’s fitting that the performance and programme is regarded with such deep affection and acclaim.

Ted is on the surface unabashed in lunacy and profanity – a surreal snapshot of both Catholic church and Irish humour, locked its own hellish exile. Beneath that, though, is a sweet, adorable and ultimately good nature, strengthened both by the chemistry on screen and in the genii of its writing. These quirks and qualities are proven by Ted‘s enduring appeal – two decades on, and I daresay there’s not a week that passes without a sprinkling of reruns – and that it seems to only get better with each worship. I could never tire of Father Ted – it’s an ever welcome indulgence. Moreover, it’s just really, really funny.

‘Night, Ted.

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22 comments
  1. These sketches and stories remind me Wall Street Journal sketches ~ what a story about Ted!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks so much, Cynthia – that’s a very generous comparison! I love those WSJ portaits; indeed, their style might be something to try for the future.

      Like

  2. Bill Fufkin said:

    You` have completely captured that twinkle in Dermot’s eye, that made him so endearing as father Ted…poignant and powerful tribute to he and the show. Brilliant. B

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Bill! It’s a show that I hold very dear, so I’m glad to have done it justice. It’s been a lot of fun!

      Like

  3. Not only is the perspective terrific but I love how you’ve captured his nose (noses are very hard for a lot of people)!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Teresa! I’m normally quite lucky with noses; it’s eyes and especially lips that tend to trouble me more. But appropriately enough, Ted’s nose was a bit of a struggle – not so much for the form, but the shading. I gave up worrying about it in the end, so I’m glad it looks okay! 😛

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Charlie! Haha! Yes, you can forego everything else if you watch Father Ted!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Rebecca said:

    Steady now! Your Ted portrait has captured his essence. What a wonderful, original and complex character he was. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Indeed – fantastically written and fantastically portrayed. 🙂 Thanks, Rebecca!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Ha ha! He certainly is! Thank you, Laura – very much!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Lee Hesketh said:

    This is so awesome!! Love him. Somehow I completely forgot about the lingerie store 😛 I agree, Ted gets better every time you watch it, it’s fab!<3

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      How could you forget the lingerie department, Lee!?! Thank you, sir. It is indeed a marvellous show.

      Liked by 2 people

  6. Awesome drawing! What a great tribute to Father Ted. I miss that programme so much. Please someone put reruns on in August.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Catherine! It was great fun to do. Keep an eye on More4 would be my advice – it’s often being repeated on there.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Haha, yes! I’ll always love Father Ted. Brilliant likeness here. Nice woik!
    Hehe. That episode above is one of my favourites. Love the terrible vindictive award acceptance speech, and the mysterious Todd Unctious. 🙂 . Very sad about the actor though 😦 I haven’t seen him in anything else, so to me he’ll always be Father Ted.

    P.s. please don’t feel pressured to answer each and every one of the many comments i’m making! I’m just trying to slowly catch up on everybody’s creativities…..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks again! Oh yes, this episode is just fantastic. You can’t have a Christmas without it. I LOVE that award speech so much – also the hosts introducing him by going on (and on) about his controversies. “No charges were brought against him, even though authorities were confused by what they called BIZARRE irregularities in his accounts”. Absolute genius all round.

      Liked by 1 person

      • haha, yes. Agreed! Gotta love Graham Linehan’s writing. I love pretty much everything he’s been involved in.
        Love how little Ted-isms get into everyday life, too; i’ve seen photos of people at protests with signs saying ” Careful now” and “Down with this sort of thing”, hehe.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Yes! It’s lovely to see how much it has become part of the psyche, not just here but all over the globe!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Indeed. Yep, it’s a little more underground here, but i do occasionally run into other Aussies who love it, and it makes my day 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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