Next Dimension: Windmill Worlds

In the wittering of my last post I mentioned – for what must have been the hundredth time – that rendering vast broadland settings to stage my windmill models was tormenting my ageing machine. In finally beginning to think of a way about this, I touted the idea of ditching the landscape for figurine-esque stand, ornamental presentation, or perhaps restricting to just a small patch of land.

I’ve ultimately thrown these ideas together in my first play around, presenting the mills as dominant over their own miniature ‘world’, a vaguely faithful snapshot of their real-life vicinity (which was how I went about the landscapes). Here, and with the concept in mind, I’ve gone a bit over the top on saturation in an attempt to give a more elevated, idyllic feel to the thing.

windmill-worldThe bushes are created by displacement maps on simple hemispheres. This allows things to run ten times smoother, though there are some pesky intersections with other objects, something I don’t entirely know how to fix. The world itself is quite simple. It’s made up of two layers: a hemisphere of water beneath a hemisphere of terrain – grass, or reeds where appropriate, again achieved by displacement. I simply cut into the greenery wherever necessary to reveal the river (it’s more like the Broads than I thought!). Criminally, I originally neglected water completely, so this was a late revision – how foolish it was to try and represent the Broads without water! They look so much stronger for it, especially with the scenery options that became available.

ww-3herringfleetww-1boardmansww-stantonww-2berneyarmsBe sure to purchase all four now! They’d look great on your shelf, standing in union:

ww-0collectionI confess I don’t actually know if those are accurate in scale – I fear not, but they could easily be tweaked.

These were really, really fun to make, but in terms of opting for this over the previous, I’m not sure. The use of displaced shapes instead of complex trees might alleviate the performance problems anyway. All the same, it’d be a shame not to take this any further, as I think there is something coming through. I’m sure the concepts can co-exist!

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30 comments
    • Jacob said:

      It’s the look I was going for, Camilla, so that’s reassuring. Thank you!

      Like

  1. Bill Fufkin said:

    Well, now you know: always listen to my advice…tee hee! These turned out better than I could have imagined…impressive and fuzzy-attractive. How can I arrange an order? B

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Haha, oh, I shall always listen to Uncle Bill! Thanks – I’m glad you like them.

      Like

  2. Omg wow these are amazing. I wish I knew how to do this 3D stuff, we have a tree trunk at our hospice, the only part left standing from a poorly tree that had to be removed. We plan to have it sculpted, carved to represent the new forest. I said I would have a look at some design ideas, and plan an assortment of new forest creatures, starting with the ground dwellers circling at the base, working Upto the tree creatures, then the sky found animals bats owls etc…oh and parakeets as they are also wild around the hospice. In my head it looks great, but if I had your programme, and knowledge I could really show my hidden deep within ideas, lol ( is it an expensive programme?)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Rebecca!

      This project of yours sounds like a lot of fun. C4D is very expensive, but there are a lot of cheaper alternatives. I’ve not used it but have heard positive things about Blender, which is in fact available for free. https://www.blender.org/ Google SketchUp is another – quite simple to use, but coming with generally less sophisticated results.

      Or I suppose you could just do some concept sketches! 😛 But it’d be really awesome to see what you could do with these programs, be it now or in the future.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks Jacob, I will do a few sketches, maybe I will get my daughter Leah to look up blender….she might give it a go for me??

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Perhaps! As a designer 3D would be a great skill for her to have, if she hasn’t looked into it already. Uni is the best time to learn! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Rebecca said:

    Brilliant, Jacob! Figurines aren’t my thing generally, but these are really lovely and make an attractive set – what about dabbling in a bit of 3D printing? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Ooh, I never thought of that! There’s an idea. Do you think they could print lifesize models? 😉

      I’m so glad you like these, Rebecca – I knew I had to win you over on the concept!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Lee Hesketh said:

    I LOVE these Jay! Such a good idea!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Laura! Ha – I wouldn’t worry, it mostly goes over my own head too!

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Sissh said:

    These are brilliant! I got so excited seeing these and thought they are really cool. Way to be creative in solving your processing problem! I think your previous work was fantastic – but this takes the cake in my opinion. Can’t wait to see more if you do decide. ^_^

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks ever so much, Sissh! What a lovely comment. I will endeavour to fit in a bit of both!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Cathe said:

    I’m just amazed! This has got to take some serious mad skills to create Jacob!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Cathe! Lots of trial and error, and a fair bit of fun. 😉 But yes, I was pleasantly surprised by the results!

      Like

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks so much, Teresa – these were really a lot of fun to put together.

      And I loved your selfie, by the way!

      Like

  7. Anthony King said:

    In love with these windmills Jacob! Congratulations on yet again presenting such incredible designs 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks Anthony – they were a lot of fun to put together!

      Like

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