Church Times

burghcastlechurch-0These two churches actually bookend my previous post within my latest pursuit of old Norfolk material, with the last above and the first below. So, really, I’ve posted the three of them in entirely the wrong order. Oh well!

I didn’t have much time to draw, but really wanted to get something out today, so took that as the push to go stark raving mad. Above is a drawing of the church of St Peter and St Paul, of Burgh Castle, replete with its round tower. While much of the building’s fabric is of medieval age, it most likely originated in the late Anglo-Saxon period. Small wonder, then, that it has such a presence; while I’ve always adored Burgh Castle and the ruins of the Roman fort, the church unsettled me as a youngster. Besides summer visits, we would go annually on the Sunday before Christmas for a carol concert, and naturally it would be pitch dark and freezing, the winds howling around you. Scary. Thankfully, I can say that, on revisiting in 2013 for my sister’s wedding, I’ve got over this apprehension and was just able to enjoy it for the evocative wonder that it is. I’m even tempted to go back out there at night to see what’s going on!

Coming in at under thirty minutes, it was chaotic by my standards, putting me in mind of the Wheel of Time (one for the long-standing readers, there!) It’s really pretty mediocre, but at least the restrictions produced a different outcome, and there’s semblance of energy there. Above all else, it was fun.

St Mary’s of Somerleyton is a treasure for me – mostly, I confess because it was on that Norfolk episode of Interceptor, which I’ve probably referenced more on this blog alone than anybody else has the entire series in the past twenty-five years. Oh well! I don’t think I’ve ever been inside, but it’s a most pleasant little church, and dates back to the 1400s. It sits not too far away from the splendid Somerleyton Hall.

somerleytonchurch-1I think the above a bit stolid for the structure. Uninspiring. I enjoy working quite meticulously, as you’ve probably gathered, but I got to feeling that churches demand far greater atmosphere than is tendered here with or without the Photoshop trickery, so took the opportunity today, with the results you’ve now seen. While not completely convinced, I feel there is perhaps a happy medium in lurking in there somewhere – it’s not like there aren’t a wealth of other churches with which to practice. I suppose I’ll have to try some more and see where it goes!

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21 comments
  1. z03luca said:

    I love old buildings from stones, castles, churches, homes, any… they talk to me about history. My dream is to buy old colonial stone house for renovation.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Jacob said:

      Oh, definitely. Such inspiration from the stories those old stones provoke – if only they could talk, and tell us of all that they’ve witnessed! Thanks, Camilla!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Have you done any churches in Norwich? They used to say there was a pub there for everyday of the week and a church for every sunday. Stuck in a traffic jam on Grapes Hill once we counted how many steeples we could see.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      I haven’t as yet, I’ve mostly been looking at the more rural locations, but indeed the saying definitely suggests I should! I went to university in the city and, sure enough, encountered a fair few beauties (pubs too, naturally!)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Big thanks, Phil! Yes, one of the things I love the most about these churches is their sturdy and not-so-sturdy architecture; the various additions from different eras make for an interesting hotchpotch!

      Like

    • Jacob said:

      Cheers, Charlie! Oh, well, then you simply must come to Norfolk – we’ve hundreds of the things. And windmills. And me (you can’t have everything, I suppose!)

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Rebecca – yes, I’m quite into this; it’s a nice throwback to the drawings I used to do as a child while also now being more appreciative of the history and background of these places. Good fun!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks so much, Teresa! Glad you like it. It was certainly nice to work a bit brisker than usual.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Rebecca said:

    Jacob, I like these very much indeed! Keep ’em coming please… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Ah, thanks so much, Rebecca! I’m sure I will revisit – and here’s hoping, when the weather gets a bit more inviting, I might even get to go church hunting!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Bill Fufkin said:

    Good performance under unfamiliar conditions. There are sounds…movements…in old churches…not to mention, the “stained glass” windows. I can see how visiting Burgh Castle would be an unnerving experience for young Jacob. B

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Big thanks, Bill! Actually, I did find the stained glass windows rather intimidating. I guess it’s the powerful, staring faces and images that are placed upon them.

      Like

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  6. As someone mentioned up there ^ i’d bloody love to convert an old church into a house!
    I like that this drawing has an eeriness about it. I’m loving the colour scheme; the darkness. I reckon it’s haunted 😉
    Anyhoo, you’ve done loads of stuff i must now catch up on! So, i’m off to do just that now!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanking you! Ooh, yes, there’s a definite eeriness out there. I’d so love to go out there in the dead of night and see what’s happening – even as a sceptic on the ghost front, it’d be bloody terrifying!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Spooky fun times! It’d be best done with a small group of people, mefinx. I’d be too chickenshit to venture there alone in the darque!

        Liked by 1 person

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