Clayrack Drainage Mill

clayrack3-20bBack to resplendence for a moment, as this model has been sitting around for about a month now, waiting to say hello. Here is Clayrack Drainage Mill, a small but very impressive hollow-post pump which dates back to the early 19th century, with its career ending in 1903. Though it spends retirement beside the River Ant in How Hill, Ludham – just a short walk north of Boardman’s Mill and Turf Fen Mill – it was situated in the village of Ranworth until 1981, when it was moved and fully restored.

With three different mills so close together, it’ll come of no surprise to anybody reading this that I loved How Hill as a child, and indeed still do. It’s a really lovely place; you not only have these on a nice riverside walk, but also the Edwardian How Hill House and the Toad Hole Cottage, a tiny museum set in what was a marshman’s house.

These are the fruits of my playing around with Vue. It’s been something of a mixed bag. While the skies and vegetation look incredible, integration of my Cinema 4D models has proven harder than expected, with a couple of crashes here and there, though I’m quite sure that’s down to my machine not getting any younger. What’s more, the free program stamps even more watermarks over you once you’ve used it for thirty days, as you can see in the above renders. That’s totally to be expected, but they are bothering me, and I have a viable alternative in C4D, so I’m probably going to revert to that. Vue is a great looking programme, though, and comes much recommended.

clayrack3-3The sun sets on Vue, for now at least. It’s been fun!

clayrack3-5

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18 comments
    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Camilla. I do enjoy playing with the sunsets in this program!

      Like

      • z03luca said:

        Colour of sunset are amazing. I did from my bedroom some photos. Every evening is different…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Indeed, it varies with the seasons. I find there’s something crisp and beautiful about the winter sunsets. Great stuff; you’re lucky to have such a view of the show from your bedroom! Mine faces the wrong way, and it’s quite a built-up area so I wouldn’t catch much anyway.

        Like

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Charlie! Sure, come on over! 😉 It’s been pleasantly springlike here today actually, so there’s yet more incentive; perhaps our collective natural angle twisted Mother Nature’s arm. Hooray! I hope it’s been nice where you are!

      Liked by 1 person

  1. dawnmarie said:

    Jacob, if you after being honest and comparing your work to others how would you rate yourself? I’m asking because lots of times I have to look closely to make sure what you are posting isn’t just a photograph. I think about the main stream media and stories on the net and wonder…how easy or common would it be for many of the things we see to be…made up? It is kinda scary. Right now when I see digital art, I can see a sort of video game quality to it, but I have no idea what other programs can do and how advanced programs are at this time. I suspect very very realistic, to the point that you can’t tell if it is a photo or video or digital art…

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Honestly, I wouldn’t rate myself especially highly; there are far better-equipped 2D and 3D artists all over the internet. That’s okay, though – this is just for fun, and still I’m proud enough of the work to share it online.

      Seeing these as photographs when they’re not is probably a compliment, as it means I must have done a good job with my model. Thanks! I see where you’re coming from, though, certainly – it can prove a bit of a quandary. There are times when I wish my work had more character to it, so that perhaps the lines between ‘artist’ and ‘technician’ were a bit clearer, but my style has always been about detail, and I often seem to come full circle in that regard. This being said, I’ve loosened up with some landscape drawings/paintings recently and really enjoyed it, so we’ll have to see where that goes.

      Well, pretty much every photo you see in the media has been doctored to some degree – to the extent that, when they’re not, they make a song and dance about it! It’s incredible what these programs can do, and indeed scary when used for distorting perceptions of reality. I’ve done it myself, it’s not good. Photoshop is an extremely powerful tool, and you have to think the whole landscape is only going to grow.

      Coming back to art: maybe there is something inherrently deceptive in the photorealistic approach? Maybe creating that moment of trickery is part of its charm – like a magic trick, almost? Interesting questions to consider – thanks, Dawn.

      Liked by 1 person

      • dawnmarie said:

        Indeed crazy!!!!! Prime time for deception. Yikes.

        Ya, I meant it as a compliment…and just thinking if Jacob can do these, what the heck are people with really advanced programs doing and how much wool is being pulled over our eyes. Twilight zone.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Ooh, that last one…again, it looks like a fotergiraffe! ( an alternative to “photato”, dontcha know). I’m pretty sure you could compile a book on the subject of mills! ( Maybe an idea? Are Mill Historians a thing? Yes, probably. But are there any who are able to create artistic renderings of them also? Well, now there is, and it’s you!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Haha, ‘fotergiraffe’ sounds worryingly Norfolk, actually – was that the intention? 😉 Still, though, nothing can quite match the wondrous photato.

      That would be a fun project! I’m sure I could give it a go. I’ve probably said before, but when I was very young I knew the name and age of basically every windmill on the Broads, from a photato. There are definitely books on the subject, as at that time I used to repeatedly loan them from our local library for research and drawing reference!

      There are a couple of people I’ve found who make models. Nice to know I’m not the only one, eh. 😉

      https://3dwarehouse.sketchup.com/model.html?id=e19458ed9cf2f6313d7599b04ed8fca2

      This guy has made several Google SketchUp models, which look a lot more accurate than mine, it has to be said. Damn, his sails are so perfect! (swoon)

      And a short while ago I found this absolute beauty: a model of a Suffolk windmill put together over a period of six months (!) http://www.eadt.co.uk/news/an_incredible_4ft_replica_of_bardwell_windmill_is_on_display_for_open_day_1_4054652

      And it’s completely accurate, down to the number of shutters in the sails. How stunning is that? I’m inspired to try a similar ‘cutaway’ render, actually, but with a Norfolk drainage pump. We’ll have to see if it pans out!

      Liked by 1 person

      • haha, quite accidental, but i’m glad for the happy coincidence 🙂
        Yeah, you should! It’s obviously a passion, and there are clearly people who are enjoying your info and pics ( me included, obviously). Plus people like that first guy you linked there.
        Woaaahhh! That 4ft replica is incredible!!!! The detail! Down to all the little parts inside as well….I want one. I have a love of miniatures which i don’t talk about much…but when i’m rich, i’m going to have a little outdoor village, complete with a train/station etc. Oh, and a windmill, of course 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Isn’t it just? What a work of art. I can quite see how it took six months of diligent work!

        Oh, that sounds adorable. Have you ever been to a model village? You should build your own – you could even have miniatures of those ‘Big Things’ that are scattered around 😉 There’s one on our seafront, or at least, there used to be (it’s been so long since I’ve been down there!) I’ve photatos somewhere of little me in there, naturally standing beside the windmill!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I haven’t actually; just seen pics of them on the ‘net. I’ve of course seen some indoor model towns, but they are much smaller. Still great, though!
        I’d love to build one….!
        There’s a little musuem not far from me which is supposed to have a brilliant model steam train in it. I’m not sure whether it actually moves or not- i’m pretty sure it would..i’ll have to go and find out 🙂
        Aww, how cute. The windmills had you under their spell even then!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Phwoar! That’s so cool! I’m looking forward to beig rich!
        Well there’s the model steam train at the museum, but there IS also a real live one that goes past my house several times a day! One of the stations is really close to my house! Here’s a piccy : https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8207/8244031718_63f4cb92a6_b.jpg not the best pic of the train, but goves a clue of the surroundings. I haven’t been on the train, as it’s quite expensive! But they obviously do a roaring trade with the tourists, as it’s always packed.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        That’s gorgeous! Aw, I can imagine the joy of that turning up at the station. And what a lovely setting too – all those lush trees! I want a go too 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • It is really pretty! I’m super lucky to be living around there 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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