Ruined

broads-burghcastle4I felt that a natural next step in this impromptu series would be to look at some ruins – what’s more, ruins almost immediately adjacent to sites looked at previously. While we’re here, and all that!

Just a short walk south of Burgh Castle’s Church of St. Peter and St. Paul is what remains of a Roman fort. An imposing site it most certainly is, the walls some fifteen feet of crumbly flint, stone and tile construction, dating back to around 300 AD. One of a series of strategically placed shore forts, its main duty was to watch over and fend off assaults on both Breydon water – which was not so much water as vast inland sea at the time – and the North sea. After the Romans had left Britain, it was reoccupied, believed to be the site of an early Christian monastery and later a Norman castle.

broads-burghcastle1broads-burghcastle2a
The western wall has long since collapsed, tumbling down the hill and into the water and unveiling a breathtaking view across the broadland, now dominated by Berney Arms Mill and passing leisure craft. Needless to say, as if the area weren’t attractive enough to me as a child, this sealed the deal! And it remains quite gripping as an adult, I’d say – coupled with the birdsong, the wind rustling through the trees and a warm, spring sun, one of the most peaceful retreats I know.

broads-burghcastle5
Large pieces appear precariously askew, but nevertheless are stable – an enduring testament to the skills of those who built them. Many of the wonks were caused by the Norman castle, whose construction entailed breaching several sections of the fort’s south wall, and erecting a giant mound upon which it would perch. While very little trace of the castle itself is evident, the mound is clearly identified, as are the consequences of such a project!

broads-burghcastle3More good playtime. Some of the experimental scatter brushes I made to help with the wall’s make-up are a bit iffy, especially in the last one, and I probably won’t use those again, but it’s been quite invigorating trying to capture some of this landmark’s striking energy and mystique. I may yet return to it!

Advertisements
23 comments
    • Jacob said:

      Thanks ever so much, Rebecca! The last one was unique in that it was done as highlights on a black ‘canvas’, rather than the other way around. I find that approach does lend itself better to drama. And we’ve chiefly Photoshop to thank for the blue effect – just a layer placed over the top!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Kerfe! I like otherworldly – certainly it’s a place that takes you back in time. It’s been good fun trying to capture that atmosphere.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Bill Fufkin said:

    Well, these certainly are not “Ruined”, Jacob…I really enjoyed them. I can tell it`s a special, and illuminating place. B

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Ha – well, that’s good to hear! Thanks, Bill, as always. I’m having lots of fun.

      Like

  2. Rebecca said:

    I’m loving the exploration you’re doing Jacob, really good marks and atmosphere, reminiscent of lovely soft media like charcoal and pastels. The first one even reminds me of a monoprint. Smashing! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Rebecca! I’m glad you’re enjoying it as much as I am – it’s been nice to ‘break out’ in a direction I tend to shy away from in portraiture. I’m thrilled with the monoprint resemblance – I’ve always loved those, but never was very good at the process!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Rebecca said:

        Computer version is much cleaner, too! 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Ha! Yeah, definitely a pro!

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Love these; espesh the 1st and 3rd ones ( that 3rd one almost has a Monet /some other impressionist vibe to it! The LIGHT!).
    I kinda wanna try doing a landscape now….i’ve never been much good at those though. I can take an ok photo of a lovely landscape, but i rarely feel compelled to try to paint/ draw one. When it happens, they never seem to work. Maybe it’s a matter of practice? But mostly i’m just content to view other people’s efforts, i think 😉
    You really do live near some amazing places. They’re obviously providing plenty of inspiration lately! Great to see. I look forward to more! * fingers crossed*

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Ah, I’m delighted you like the painted one – I thought I’d try and introduce colour into these settings. I had indeed been looking at Impressionist works before tackling this – and, as it happens, I had Monet’s ‘Fields of Tulip With The Rijnsburg Windmill’ on my bedroom wall. Just like every young/teenage boy, right?

      You should give it a go! I mean, really, these are so simple and brisk – another pro, after so many ten-hour slogs on faces! – and it’s been invigorating to just dream something up; imagination is something I’ve really been neglecting of late. I’m sure with the magnificent Australian landscape you could whip up something really special.

      This whole exploration of the area, in both these and my 3D models, has certainly renewed my childhood awe and appreciation of where I come from. I am totally in love with the Broads and nature again, and that feels great. You should definitely pay it a visit if you’re on these shores!

      Phew! Well, I just want to say, thanks so much for going back and looking at each and every post since you were last here. It must have taken considerable time, for which I’m very grateful. Keep on rockin’! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ah, well that all makes sense, then. Very very impressionistic! And that’s cool teenage boy if you ask me! Younguns into art is a wonderful thing.
        Oh yes, i too neglect the imagining sometimes…(when it comes to drawing/ artwork anyway). It can be hard not to freak out about not having a reference, especially of you’re aiming for realism.
        Oh, i SO want to travel to your shores! There are so many places over there that i want to see. As soon as i’ve made my millions ( or, y’know, just enough to travel freely), the UK is my first stop. It’s so centrally located, too. Very near to a bunch of countries i want to visit.
        Aww, no probs. I didn’t want to miss out on anything!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Great atmosphere you’re achieving with these Jacob, really powerful, I’m hoping you do more!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks so much, Phil – this means an awful lot coming from you! I’m certain that a big part of any energy you see is channelled from your own work, so thanks again for that continual inspiration! ❤

      Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, JP! I’m thrilled about that, as it was experimental, to say the least. I do quite like how its lighting turned out.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. dawnmarie said:

    Loving all of these. The one with the purple and the last one are striking. But, the fat tree in that to last is very cool. Fun!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Ruins have their own special beauty and magic which you’ve totally captured here in a more abstract form!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      They certainly do – so full of wonder. Thanks ever so much, Teresa, glad you like the style!

      Liked by 1 person

Talk to me!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: