Little Snoring

littlesnoring-1I thought the village an appropriate subject to bring life to what has, of late, been a rather sleepy place!

There’s probably something to be said for the state of the windmill, too, but we shan’t go there. Standing on the border of Little Snoring and neighbouring Great Snoring, this trestle mill, replete with its trendy porch, worked producing flour from 1805 to at least 1922, ultimately being dismantled in 1950. Curiously, the trestle foundation was left in place and remains apparent, though the site itself is now overrun by vegetation.

littlesnoring-2

A landmark about Little Snoring that you can see today is St Andrew’s, yet another round tower church, a trademark of East Anglia, and subjected to numerous cosmetic changes over the centuries. The Norman tower of flint actually stands a few feet detached from the present building, and is capped not by a traditional spire but a nineteenth century conical cap, complete with lookout gables and spike. It certainly captured my eye.

Many thanks to the wonderful website of Tricia Booth, whose extensive knowledge on the Snorings made an unplanned voyage most interesting. I should quite like to visit one day.

With that, we wake – one hopes!

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32 comments
    • Jacob said:

      Quite. Just whack him with the pillow! 😉 Thanks ever so much, JP.

      Like

  1. Wonderful atmospheric work as usual Jacob, what a great name for a place 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Isn’t it just – we’ve the Anglo Saxons to thank for that, I suppose! Thanks, Phil, ’twas nice to get back into the swing again.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. LOL! Funny! And terrific drawings, too! Great to see a post of yours; it’s been a while. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Teresa – glad you enjoyed it! It’s nice to be back.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Lee Hesketh said:

    Lol, great little snoring! The windmill makes me think it’s haunted, and I’ve never seen a church like that before… I’ve seen one somewhere with a weird distorted steeple but I can’t for life of me remember where that’s at.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      Thanks, Lee! I think there are a few churches with that style of appendage. It’s certainly a sight!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Wait- those are real names of places? That’s so cool. “Little snoring”. Sounds like something straight out of a fairytale! And looks it, too, if your wonderful drawings are anything to go by! I kinda want to live in that first one…..sigh!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jacob said:

      I know, right? Such a whimsical name for a village, though I suppose the Saxons titled it perfectly legitimately! You might enjoy this little map of our curious place names, though I doubt very much it’s exhaustive:

      Haha, ‘Crapstone’ – that sounds like one of our mashed up insults. And, I dare you to try and say that Welsh one! 😉 I’d try myself, but I’m off to Strangalwilly.

      Glad you like the drawings! Yes, that mill does look pretty, doesn’t it. A shame indeed that, like so many, it was pulled down before all the preservation Trusts were founded. I rather like it’s little balcony and can imagine whiling away the summer evenings on there.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Lol @ ‘Crapstone’! Oh my 😀 Equal laughiness at ‘Strangalwilly’. And ‘Curry Mallet’!? Oh my god, i can’t stop laughing!
        ‘Wetwang’ ?? Is this for real? All of these are too hilarious to be real! ‘Loose bottom’ and ‘Catbrain’?!!!?? Now come on! Surely you’re messing with my head! ‘Matching Tye’? hahaa, oh man, i have tears in my eyes! And that Welsh one O.o…i bet it’s pronounced ‘James’ or something.
        Oh dear. I’ll attempt to respond to the rest of your comment there! The mill IS so purrdy. Such a shame so many lovely things have been destroyed! I’m glad there are photos at least. Even better that people such as yourself draw them!
        Ok, now back to laughing at these place names…!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Ha ha ha, well, I’m glad you enjoyed them as much as I did! They’re brilliant, aren’t they. The original host of Countdown went on about Wetwang on the show to the extent that he was actually appointed as honorary Mayor, so I’ve known about that one for a little while! ‘Barton in the Beans’ to me sounds like a dialect euphemism for some embarrassing ailment. “Ooh, I’ve got terrible barton in the beans!” And ‘Marsh Gibbon’ sounds like such a Norfolk insult.

        Haha, James – more than likely, to be honest! Imagine someone telling you their name was ‘James’ and then writing that down. 😛

        Liked by 1 person

      • They’re amazing. I can barely believe they’re for real!
        ‘Mayor of Wetwang’. What an honour!
        Haha, ‘Barton in the Beans’ SO does sound like exactly that. You have to wonder just HOW such names were thought of. Like, maybe a dude named Barton had indeed eaten too many beans. Or maybe just grew beans. Or danced regularly amidst a field of beans, alone.
        YES! I can imagine that as an insult: “Oi, ya marsh gibbon!”
        Imagine naming a kid James and spelling it like that? What a great joke to play on the world.( And the poor kid! Maybe would be better to change yr own name to that spelling…or, name a cat or dog with a name of that spelling, just to mess with the heads of any vets you may visit )…but seriously, Welsh must be a bloody difficult langage to learn! From the tiny amount of it i’ve heard and seen written, it seems that barely anything sounds the way it looks written down, and ridonkulously looong, hard to pronounce words are too common.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Haha! You’re not far off! Wikipedia says: ‘Barton is one of many places in England with this name[…]Leicestershire was once noted for cultivating the broad bean and in this way the bean has been perpetuated in place-names.’ Perhaps there’s some fun to be had in looking into some of the others.

        The poor child! Imagine if that were you, and you’re in an exam or something. I’d be spending half the time writing my name and the other half checking I’d spelt it correctly!

        It’s all those Ls, and the sparsity of vowels that throws me a little with Welsh, but it is quite charming in its way. It’s quite a little-spoken language these days, I expect – perhaps we should try and learn it, in the pursuit of preserving such culture! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ha! Well that’s a far more sensible and logical explanation than i was expecting! In which case i’m not sure i wanna know about Catbrain O.o …oh wow, and i only just noticed ‘New Invention’. Haha. “look at this new piece of geography we invented!”
        YES, the disproportionate amount of consonants sure throw me. But you’re right, it definitely has a charm all its own. I actually had a flatmate once who was learning Welsh. She showed me one of the books on the subject, and it looked VERY confusing…yet fascinating 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        I refer once more to Wiki: ‘The name “Catbrain” derives from the Middle English “cattes brazen” which is a reference to the rough clay mixed with stones that is characteristic soil type of the location.’

        Oh, and courtesy of that page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Place_names_considered_unusual Have fun! (I haven’t actually read it yet, but saw ‘Shitterton’ out the corner of my eye and lost it.)

        You know what? I’ve just downloaded an Open University Welsh beginners’ course. Why not? 😉 Though, saying this, I downloaded Creative Writing and Art History stuff from them about two years ago, and have yet to actually do it. I really am that bad; I desperately need Clapperboard Person!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Phew! Well that’s a relief. Much less gory than i’d anticipated!

        Aww, yiss! Thanks so much for the link- it sounds promising! 😀 Shitterton! Hahahahaa! Imagine having that as your address…..102 Catbrain lane, Shitterton. Nice!
        Oh cool! Good on ya. You should maybe do some posts on any interesting tidbits that come up? (It’d possibly provide some pressure to keep at it too :P).
        Aww, i can relate that sort of unfinished business. I think the internet can be detrimental to productivity in that way; on one hand it’s a goldmine of interesting information that inspires us to research new things, but on the other hand, it’s a goldmine of interesting information that inspires us to research new things…instead of concentrating on the intresting thing we’d originally intended to immerse ourselves in!
        Maybe ‘Clapperboard Person’ should be a new occupation? What a funny business idea that could be.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Ooh, maybe I will sprinkle in some Welsh as I go and see if anyone notices. 😉 It’d probably provide slight motivation,
        at least. Characteristically, I’ve not looked at it yet… (dreads that ominous clapperboard)

        Haha, yeah. Or imagine someone chatting you up and asking, “So, what do you do for a living?”
        “I snap a clapperboard in peoples faces.”

        Hook line and sinker, surely?

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, do! Even though i’ve no idea how to pronounce them, Welsh words do look lovely written down ( or..typed).

        All good; don’t pressure yourself. See it as a new book you’ve bought that you’ll get around to reading when you’re in the right frame of mind for it 🙂

        Haha! That would be amazing actually. Nobody could accuse you of having a boring humdrum job!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Noswaith dda, Bon! Sut mae?

        There we are 😉 Anyway, hwyl! 😉

        Can I just say how much I love that ‘good morning’ is ‘Bore da’. I am so bore da in the mornings 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oh wow- you’ve started 😉 I’ve no idea what those worlds mean, but they sound/ look cool!
        Ha! How very apt. Having to say good morning to everyone ( or just, y’know, be awake) in the morning bores me too!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        ‘Good afternoon, how are you?’ 😉 Ha, well quite – I’ve realised that, while I’m learning the words, I have absolutely no idea of their pronunciation! I didn’t think this through 😛

        Liked by 1 person

      • Aha! Well, now i need to know how to say ” Not bad thanks, mate. Yaself?”
        Dang. Don’t they tell you how to pronounce them? You’d think that’d be a pretty crucial detail- especially with Welsh! Oh well, just make it up, haha 😀 People who aren’t Welsh won’t be able to tell 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        I’m hoping there are some audio files somewhere that I’ve missed – otherwise this dream to speak Welsh might be dashed pretty quickly. But LOL! You’re probably right on that last point!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hopefully! They surely should provide some sort of pronunciation guide . If all else fails, maybe there’ll be something on the ‘net? Hoping so!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Found them! I just had to download the files in a different format.

        Oh gosh, it’s doing a ‘repeat after me’ thing and I can’t stop chuckling at how it reminds me of school and how badly I’m pronouncing these. But I have ascertained that:

        ‘Sut mae’ sounds like ‘shum eye’
        ‘Bore da’ sounds like ‘borra dar’
        ‘Hwyl’ sounds like ‘hoil’

        So now you can use this stuff! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Aha! Good good. It would’ve been kinda tricksy to learn such a language withut a pronunciation guide!! Very glad you’re able to access that now.
        COOL. “Sit mae” and “hwyl” are not how i expected them to sound. Aww, now i feel like learning a language too. I’ve often wanted to do this, but my memory is so awful. I feel i’d need to be around a bunch of native speakers in order to properly learn another language. That’d be cool .

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        I’m not sure how well it’s going to go teaching myself, but we’ll see. You should learn too! Then give it a few months and we’ll be blogging and Scrabbling in Welsh 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • That’s an awesome idea. I’m not sure i can trust my motivation levels 😉 , but i think it’d have to be easier if there’s someone you know doing it too. Conversing ( or trying to, at least!) in any language you’re learning would have to help.
        Ha! Imagine Welsh Scrabbling. Some of the words probably wouldn’t fit on the board 😛

        Liked by 1 person

      • Jacob said:

        Haha, that’s a good point – they should make a Welsh edition Scrabble: dining table size board 😉 and you’d have to tweak the distribution of the tiles too; chuck in a hundred extra Ls! Imagine Countdown in Welsh. Consonant, please? L. Another consonant? L. Vowel? L…

        Liked by 1 person

      • Haha! Hilarious visuals i’m getting there! That’d be a fun thing to make as a novelty actually. Well, maybe hard work to make. To own one, though. That’d be fun.
        “Vowel? L..”Lolololol ( as the kiddies say) 😀 I can imagine it! What a nightmare…!

        Liked by 1 person

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